Media: Slideshow

Attempts to Control the Influenza Pandemic

Making Anti-Influenza Masks

Red Cross workers make cloth masks to cover the nose and mouth, a preventative to the spread of the virulent strain of influenza that afflicted the United States and the world in 1918–1919. Red Cross workers made 260,000 masks during the pandemic. 

Created: ca. 1918–1919

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration

Treating Soldiers to Prevent Influenza

On November 6, 1918, a doctor inside an army medical tent at Love Field in Texas sprays an unidentified sustance into a soldier's throat as a preventative against contracting the influenza virus then ravaging the country and the world.

Original Author: Unknown

Created: November 6, 1918

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration

Gargling to Prevent Influenza

World War I–era American soldiers at Camp Dix, New Jersey, gargle with salt and water after a day of work. The gargling was prescribed as a preventative against contracting the virulent influenza virus then spreading across the United States and the world in 1918–1919.

Created: ca. 1918–1919

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration

Keep Your Bed Room Windows Open!

A broadside, posted inside a Cincinnati trolley car during the influenza pandemic of 1918–1919, urges all citizens to keep their bedroom windows open. Health officials believed that keeping windows open, even during the winter months, would help control influenza and other infectious diseases. Trolley car windows were also left open to help prevent the spread of the so-called Spanish Influenza.

Original Author: Cincinnati Board of Health

Created: ca. 1918–1919

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration

Barred from Boarding a Trolley

A masked trolley car conductor in Seattle, Washington, holds his hand up, indicating that the man at right without a mask will not be allowed to board the city vehicle. During the influenza pandemic of 1918–1919, Seattle trolley officials would not permit anyone without a mask to board the cars—a measure taken in the hope of stopping the spread of the virulent influenza virus.

Original Author: Unknown

Created: ca. 1918–1919

Medium: Photographic print

Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration

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  • Treating Soldiers to Prevent Influenza

    On November 6, 1918, a doctor inside an army medical tent at Love Field in Texas sprays an unidentified sustance into a soldier's throat as a preventative against contracting the influenza virus then ravaging the country and the world.

    Original Author: Unknown

    Created: November 6, 1918

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration

  • Gargling to Prevent Influenza

    World War I–era American soldiers at Camp Dix, New Jersey, gargle with salt and water after a day of work. The gargling was prescribed as a preventative against contracting the virulent influenza virus then spreading across the United States and the world in 1918–1919.

    Created: ca. 1918–1919

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration

  • Keep Your Bed Room Windows Open!

    A broadside, posted inside a Cincinnati trolley car during the influenza pandemic of 1918–1919, urges all citizens to keep their bedroom windows open. Health officials believed that keeping windows open, even during the winter months, would help control influenza and other infectious diseases. Trolley car windows were also left open to help prevent the spread of the so-called Spanish Influenza.

    Original Author: Cincinnati Board of Health

    Created: ca. 1918–1919

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration

  • Barred from Boarding a Trolley

    A masked trolley car conductor in Seattle, Washington, holds his hand up, indicating that the man at right without a mask will not be allowed to board the city vehicle. During the influenza pandemic of 1918–1919, Seattle trolley officials would not permit anyone without a mask to board the cars—a measure taken in the hope of stopping the spread of the virulent influenza virus.

    Original Author: Unknown

    Created: ca. 1918–1919

    Medium: Photographic print

    Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration